Zadok Ben-David at Singapore Botanic Gardens

Gardens by the Bay has been hailed as Singapore’s Central Park. Hogwash. Singapore Botanic Gardens is, if I were asked to make any sort of comparison, this city’s Central Park. We’ve gone for long walks—and pushed our stroller—along its meandering paths. We’ve picnicked on its grassy knolls. We’ve listened to classical music in its bandshell. And we’ve spent hours upon hours admiring its beauty and design.

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The works of the renowned Yemeni sculptor Zadok Ben-David have been installed in the Botanic Gardens as part of Sotheby’s first exhibition in Asia of outdoor sculptures for sale. “What I love about Zadok’s sculptures is that they have the ability to disappear and reappear in the landscape. You don’t get tired of them,” Alexander Platon, Sotheby’s head of private sales in Europe, told The New York Times. “These pieces are perfectly integrated to the natural landscape and look like they could have been here for a long time. They make a statement, but they’re not overwhelming and I think that it’s important they don’t interrupt the natural beauty. They add to it, embellish it.

It’s utterly magnificent. The exhibition runs until January 31. The Corten steel, or weathering steel, develops a rust-like patina when exposed to the elements. I hope to return in a week or so to view the sculptures again.

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Did you know that Mystree by the entrance to the oh-so-awesome Jacob Ballas Children’s Garden is also by Ben-David?

(Additional credits: Clockwise, from top left: Early Spring, 2008. Corten steel, 460cm; Tongue in Cheek, 2012. Corten steel, 290cm; Innerscape on the Move, 2008. Corten steel, 1150cm; Mid Spring, 2012. Corten steel, 249cm. Photographs via Sotheby’s.)

2 responses

  1. “What I love about Zadok’s sculptures is that they have the ability to disappear and reappear in the landscape. You don’t get tired of them.” << This statement is really intriguing. It makes want to see the real thing. :)